The Nighthawks

Details
Date:

May 3

Time:

08:00 pm - 09:30 pm

Click to Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-nighthawks-tickets-698537643897
Organizer

The Tin Pan

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/o/the-tin-pan-18118706299
Venue

The Tin Pan

8982 Quioccasin Road, Richmond, VA 23229

Richmond, VA, US, 23229

The Nighthawks appearing at The Tin Pan in Richmond, VA

Seating: We assign seats in order of when you purchase your tickets. All reservations are subject to a food and drink minimum of $15 per guest. Gratuity of 20% is automatically added to all food and beverage purchases.

Box Office: The Tin Pan charges lower fees for box office versus online sales. Our box office is open Tue-Sat 12PM-5PM. Please visit us during those hours or call 804-447-8189.

The Nighthawks

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Legends of Blues and Rock – “Established 1972”

On this landmark anniversary, founder, lead singer, and harpmaster, Mark Wenner, is still at the helm, while drummer Mark Stutso, guitarist Dan Hovey and bassist Paul Pisciotta all share vocals and songwriting, making this lineup on the strongest ever. Decades of gigs and countless rabid fans have earned them the name “The Best Bar Band In The World.” More than a bar band or blues band, as they’re frequently labeled, this is a band that played with Carl Perkins in addition to Muddy Waters.

Current Lineup for the Nighthawks is:

Mark Wenner: Vocals, Harmonica

Mark Stutso: Drums, Vocals

Paul Pisciotta: Bass

Dan Hovey: Guitar, Vocals

The Nighthawks was an idea in Mark Wenner’s brain long before he was able to implement it. The musical product of pre-1958 radio in Washington, D.C., he did not know there were rules against mixing blues, R&B, honky-tonk country, doo-wop, gospel and rockabilly into one delicious stew.

In 1972, Mark, then 23, returned to his hometown after a New York City band apprenticeship, eager to start a real, work-every-night band based on American roots music. He found a receptive local scene. Washington has long been a musical melting-pot of the kind that made Memphis the source point for the evolution of American music in the second half of the 20th Century. It just never had a Stax or Sun record label to tell the world. As the city exploded with an influx of people from all the surrounding states during the Great Depression and World War II, Washington became a hotbed of musical cross-fertilization. When Bill Haley first brought his wacky Pennsylvania mix of hillbilly music and rhythm and blues to D.C. in 1952, people got it. And white kids like Mark found the Howard Theater – now recently restored and part of the historic top tier of the Chitlin’ Circuit that included Baltimore’s Royal, Chicago’s Regal and New York’s Apollo – just a 25-cent bus ride away from the suburbs.